Interior Design Front Garden Tips

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Posted on March 27, 2018

Many of my clients in Melbourne have come to me with elaborate garden design ideas that when practically thought out, would cost them a small fortune to build and then maintain. A common misconception in the interior design and decoration industry is that interior designing or interior decorating focuses just on the interiors of a home. Although it is easy to be mislead by this, the true essence of interior design and decoration incorporates all the spaces in and outside of the home/building. When designing interior spaces, it is important that the exteriors blend in with the interiors otherwise there will inevitably be two different styles and personalities within the property clashing.

Interior Design: Use of Fake Grass

I recently completed a property under my signature collection The Black Estates (seen below). I designed the front garden to be elegant, sophisticated yet functional for the residents. A common mistake for many of my clients is the need to have big open spaces of sprawling natural grass that are met with deep and dense planters. The time and cost that goes into needing to maintain that type of garden is not practical and efficient. Furthermore. parking the car on the freshly watered and mowed grass is not the best option.

I highly recommend to my clients seeking advice on their garden design ideas. What I have designed in The Black Estates: Mont Albert is the process of modernising the front garden. What this means is incorporating a small car port that fits two extra cars. However, this will still allow a smaller refined front garden which is easily maintainable. Add in the customised water feature, box planters around the edge of the fake grass, together with an automated sprinkler system, the garden becomes self automated.

 

Interior Design: Use of Levels

In The Black Estates: Mont Albert, I used levels to my advantage given the natural slope of the block. Having the garden on a higher level, creates separation from the car area. Furthermore it subconsciously makes the front garden feel more secluded from the driveway. When designing your front garden, make use of the gradient of your block and incorporate levels where possible. By doing this, it allows you to create multiple spaces with separation within the one area.

One of the final elements of the front garden area was the use of directional lighting. By using them on the steps it further showcased the elevated garden. Automated lighting that runs between the steps is a great way to showcase the levels in the space. As seen creating a clear walkway into the front garden area creates a sense of exclusivity to the front garden.

This property is currently on the market for a private sale for those interested please visit Buxton for more information.

 

I look forward to sharing many more interior design ideas with you. Contact me for your next project at [email protected]

 

 

 

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